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The campaign's main priorities are:

These key priorities were determined by high and medium priorities identified in Safer journeys: New Zealand’s road safety strategy 2010–2020 (external link) .

See how often some of these factors contributed to our road toll in the last month (external link)

Speed 

More people are aware that driving at high speeds is dangerous, but there are still many people who like to travel at speeds too fast for the conditions. These drivers pose a risk to themselves and everyone else who is on the road with them.

Drink-driving

Alcohol can seriously impact a person’s driving. It slows reaction times and affects their senses. Drink-driving continues to be a major problem on New Zealand roads.

Drug-affected driving

Driving under the influence of drugs is common and widespread. It’s also a serious road safety issue as the affect of drugs impairs a driver's alertness, skill and judgement.

Young drivers

Young people in New Zealand have lower levels of driving safety when compared with their peers in other developed countries. They’re inexperienced and more likely to be involved in a fatal or serious crash.

Fatigue

There’s a perception that ‘normal levels’ of tiredness aren’t usually harmful but when combined with driving, this isn’t always the case.

Driver distraction

A driver is distracted when they pay attention to an activity that takes their focus away from the primary task of driving. Any extra activity puts demands on a driver, which may reduce their driving standard and cause them to become less observant. 

Vehicle safety

We promote vehicle safety ratings and safety features to encourage people to prioritise safety when purchasing a vehicle. Having newer, safer vehicles on New Zealand roads will also improve the country’s vehicle fleet. 

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