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CNG Home | Site map | Planning | Designing | Evaluating and monitoring | Trials | Case studies

It is important to consider the provision for cycling between intersections and the transition approaching a signalised intersection, and departing from it.  In particular:

  • Cycle lanes should continue to the intersection and terminate with an advanced stop box or advanced stop line ahead of the general traffic lane limit lines.
  • Cycle lane lines and edge lines (whether solid or dashed) should define a continuous travelling path for cycling up to the limit line.
  • It must be clear to users where motorists cross a cycle facility (and therefore must give way to people cycling in it) or where cyclists and motorists are expected to mix.
    • Where motorised traffic has to diverge or cross a cycle lane on the approach to an intersection (eg where a left turning lane forms to the left of a cycle lane), continuity (or dashed) lines should be marked instead of a solid cycle lane line. 
    • Where motorised traffic has to diverge or cross a cycle lane on the approach to an intersection (eg where a left turning lane forms to the left of a cycle lane) continuity (or dashed) lines should be marked instead of an edge line.
    • Coloured surfacing can be applied to delineate transition points where motor vehicles and cyclists cross paths.

Deliberate space should be provided to allow for safe merging and turning manoeuvres between cyclists and motorists. Any tapers on cycle lanes at transitions to the left can be a minimum of 1:10. Where a cycle lane tapers to the right, the following equation should be used for determining the length of the offset:

Ld=V * Y / 2.16

Where:

Ld = Length of taper

V = 85th percentile speed of motorised traffic (km/h)

Y = lateral shift (m)

MOTSAM Part 2, Section 3.18 provides appropriate transitions of cycle lane from midblock to intersection locations.

To discourage motorists from driving in cycle lanes at intersections, the combined width of the cycle lane and adjacent general traffic lane should not be greater than 4.8 m, otherwise general traffic may use the additional width to create to informal traffic lanes and obstruct the cycle lanes.  Where the 4.8 m width is exceeded, the kerbside cycle lane should be physically separated from the adjacent general traffic lane, eg with flexi-posts.

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