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Highways and Network Operations management system manual

Published: | Category: State highway operations , Manuals | Audience: General

The Highways and Network Operations (HNO) management system manual is a high-level manual that provides focus to and links our various procedures and processes into the system to deliver a quality service. The manual is underpinned by the various technical manuals and procedures that set quality standards and guidelines.

Making safe choices when travelling to and from school by bus

Published: | Category: Schools , Leaflets & brochures | Audiences: Communities, General, Schools & teachers

Motorists need to be extra careful when passing a stationary school bus where children are getting on or off. Always reduce your driving speed to 20km/h when passing the bus and keep an eye out for children who are walking to catch the bus, or leaving it.

Research Report 338 Developing school-based cycle trains in New Zealand

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

A cycle train is similar in approach to the ‘walking school bus’ – adult volunteer ‘conductors’ cycle along a set route to school, collecting children from designated ‘train stops’ along the way. They are well established in Belgium and are beginning to appear in the United Kingdom. Previous research in New Zealand found a high level of interest in the cycle train concept, leading us to design and conduct a trial for implementing cycle train networks here.

Research Report 396 Public transport network planning: a guide to best practice in NZ cities

Published: | Category: Sustainable land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research explores the potential for the ‘network-planning’ approach to the design of public transport to improve patronage of public transport services in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch. Network planning, which mimics the ‘go-anywhere’ convenience of the car by enabling passengers to transfer between services on a simple pattern of lines, has achieved impressive results in some European and North American cities, where patronage levels have grown considerably and public subsidies are used more efficiently.

Research Report 510 Evaluation of the C-roundabout an improved multi-lane roundabout design for cyclists

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The C-roundabout (cyclist roundabout) is a new multi-lane roundabout design (developed as part of a 2006 Land Transport NZ research project Improved multi-lane roundabout designs for cyclists) that aims to improve the safety of cyclists at multi-lane roundabouts and make multi-lane roundabouts more cyclist-friendly. A C-roundabout was installed at the Palomino Drive/Sturges Road intersection in Auckland and was evaluated between 2008 and 2011 in terms of its safety, capacity, and the opinions of cyclists, pedestrians and car drivers. The C-roundabout successfully reduced vehicle speeds to 30km/h, which is close to the speed of cyclists. This made the roundabout safer for cyclists, as well as for other road users. The installation of the C-roundabout at this uncongested site had little impact on capacity. It drew positive feedback from cyclists and pedestrians, but about half of the car drivers were not in favour of it.

P46 NZ Transport Agency State Highway Stormwater Specification

Published: | Category: Planning, design, funding, building, maintenance of the transport network , Guidance for specialists | Audiences: General, Road controlling authorities, Road traffic engineers & consultants, Roading contractors

This specification sets out the requirements for the design, construction and operation of all stormwater improvement projects. It is anticipated that the standard stormwater specification is a starting set of specifications and may be adapted to address local issues and the scope of the project.

National Land Transport Fund annual reports

Published: | Category: Annual reports , Corporate publications | Audiences: General, Local & regional government

A separate annual report is prepared for the National Land Transport Fund (NLTF) in addition to the NZ Transport Agency annual report. It provides information about how the NLTF has been invested to build a better land transport system for New Zealand.

Chain of responsibility and New Zealand road transport

Published: | Category: Commercial drivers & operators , Guidance for specialists | Audience: General

Info card providing advice chain of responsibility, how it recognises that all the people who influence drivers’ behaviour and compliance should, and must, be held accountable. This includes directors of companies.

NZ Transport Agency annual report | National Land Transport Fund annual report: 2011–2012

Published: | Category: Annual reports , Corporate publications | Audience: General

The annual report records our achievements in pursuing the NZ Transport Agency’s strategy to ensure delivery of the government’s land transport objectives and wider transport vision. Return to the NZ Transport Agency annual reports index page NZ Transport Agency 2011–12 year in review Full print version: NZ Transport Agency and NLTF annual report (end 30 June 2012)

Research Report 341 The prediction of pavement remaining life

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The primary objective of the project was the development of criteria to define the end-of–life condition of pavements. These criteria could then be used in pavement performance modelling to obtain a more robust measure of remaining life. Another objective was the generation of a new model for maintenance costs. This could then be combined with the existing models for roughness and rutting to define a distress level at which rehabilitation should occur. None of the maintenance cost models developed were particularly successful in producing a reliable prediction of maintenance costs based on the pavement characteristics available from RAMM. Therefore, a logit model was developed to predict rehabilitation decisions. The major factors in the rehabilitation model were maintenance costs, traffic levels and roughness. The rehabilitation decision model derived for this study predicted rehabilitation decisions well. Approximately 72% of pavements that had been rehabilitated were predicted as requiring rehabilitation.
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