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Research Report 638 Network and asset management: benefits of real-time data

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports

Data is essential for understanding the demands placed on road assets and transport networks. There is an opportunity through advances in real-time technologies to improve the delivery of network management and asset management activities. This requires an understanding of both the real-time technologies that are available, and the real-time information needs of network managers and asset managers.

Research Report 633 Analysis and interpretation of New Zealand long-term pavement performance data

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

A comprehensive statistical analysis and review of the dataset was undertaken on the March 2015 LTPP database, including application of transformations on the skewed raw data.

Research Report 634 Effect of road seal type on resistance to traffic stresses

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report details research carried out from 2016 to 2017 as the preparatory stage of a larger programme to understand how chipseals may be improved to withstand increases in horizontal shear forces imposed by traffic loadings. The research aimed to develop an understanding of mechanisms and factors that lead to chip loss resulting from surface shear stresses, and to develop a methodology for testing seal performance under realistic but controlled laboratory conditions.

Research Report 635 Pavement maintenance patch trials

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

There is anecdotal evidence that pavement maintenance patches fail within a few years and research was undertaken to develop a framework for predicting the life of patches to enable asset managers to choose the right treatment to give the life required with the lowest whole-of-life costs.

Research Report 628 Standardisation of laboratory compaction energies

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research reviewed the New Zealand vibrating hammer laboratory compaction test and energy standardisation thereof. The area of laboratory aggregate compaction was found to have significant problems with variability of results and reduced correlations with field compaction results, which suggests there are problems with standardisation of the compaction energies used.

Research Report 626 The long-term acoustic performance of New Zealand standard porous asphalt

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audiences: General, Road traffic engineers & consultants, Roading contractors

Research was commissioned to investigate the long-term acoustic performance of New Zealand standard porous asphalt made to TNZ P/11 Specification for open graded porous asphalt (OGPA). The research findings should be considered applicable only to New Zealand OGPA laid in high-speed environments (speed limits of 80 to 100 km/h).

Research Report 622 Best practice guide for pavement stabilisation

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports

New Zealand pavement engineers, in collaboration with colleagues in South Africa and Australia, are recognised internationally as leaders in the use of stabilisation in highway, road, airport, port and industrial hardstand pavement applications. Stabilisation is used to rectify a deficiency in a soil, aggregate or surfacing material. Stabilised materials contribute to the strength and performance of pavements at all levels: subgrade; subbase; base and surfacing.

Research Report 618 Trialling best value delineation treatments for rural roads

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audiences: General, Roading contractors

Providing a safe, comfortable, cost-effective visual environment to help drivers navigate rural roads requires a better understanding of the strengths and limitations of different delineation devices, materials and treatment configurations. An international literature review examined different options to test on low-volume rural New Zealand road settings, and an expert panel prioritised four of these options to be trialled.

Research Report 613 Seismic design and performance of high cut slopes

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

A review of the performance of slopes in historical earthquakes, a review of relevant literature describing recent research, consideration of New Zealand’s distinctive topography and seismicity, and limited numerical analyses have been carried out. Steep slopes have failed in past earthquakes, with the initiation of failures in the upper part of slopes indicating the contribution of topographical amplification of earthquake motions. Landslides have been concentrated in hanging wall areas relative to fault rupture, particularly in thrust fault rupture earthquakes.

Research Report 603 The relationship between vehicle axle loadings and pavement wear on local roads

Published: | Category: Activity management , CAPTIF , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

In New Zealand heavy vehicles are charged for using the road based on the damage caused passing over the road. The current approach to charging has its origins in American research that found doubling an axle load increased the damage as a power function with an exponent of 4, known as the Fourth Power Law. This was developed with limited pavement and vehicle load types not representative of most of the roads in New Zealand. This research provided reliable evidence on the wear characteristics of New Zealand local road pavements from accelerated pavement loading studies at the Canterbury Accelerated Pavement Testing Indoor Facility (CAPTIF). The aim was to determine the relative damage on different pavement types/strengths. The data was extended with rut depth modelling with repeated load triaxial data and validated with field data from the nationwide long-term pavement performance sites.
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