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Research Report 113 Lead-based paint management on roading structures: Section I – Results of surveys

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report is Section I of four 'stand alone' documents that can be used by road controlling authorities, maintenance engineers, and industrial painting contractors when carrying out removal or maintenance of lead-based paints on steel roading structures, to comply with their statutory obligations and minimise effects on the environment and risks to workers and public health. Section I contains the results of a survey of local and regional authorities to determine their requirements when issuing a consent for this work. The number of roading structures in New Zealand that are coated with lead-based paint are quantified. Report series

Section I - Results of surveys (report on this page)
Section II - Code of conduct
Section III - Guidelines
Section IV - Model specification
Keywords: lead paint removal, risk assessment, maintenance painting, bridges

Research Report 114 Lead-based paint management on roading structures: Section II – Code of conduct for contractors

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report is Section II of four 'stand alone' documents that can be used by road controlling authorities, maintenance engineers, and industrial painting contractors when carrying out removal or maintenance of lead-based paints on steel roading structures, to comply with their statutory obligations and minimise effects on the environment and risks to workers and public health. Report series

Section I - Results of surveys
Section II - Code of conduct (report on this page)
Section III - Guidelines
Section IV - Model specification
Keywords: lead paint removal, risk assessment, maintenance painting, bridges

Research Report 309 Trials of the use of recycled hot mix and ground tyre rubber in hot mix asphalt

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research, carried out in 2003–2004, aimed to facilitate the recycling of asphalt mix, recycled asphalt pavement (RAP), and crumb rubber (CR) from waste tyres into New Zealand roads. The objectives were to allow for the revision of the appropriate specifications to encourage recycling of these materials and to use field trials to prove the performance of recycled and crumb rubber modified mixes in practice. Keywords: asphalt mix, crumbed rubber, hot mix, recycled asphalt, recycled rubber, roads, trials

Research Report 503 A natural environment and cultural asset management system for New Zealands state highway network: towards a practical concept and application

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Internationally there is an increasing expectation for roadways to have a minimal environmental footprint, to express local environmental and cultural context, and to protect or respect natural, historical and landscape assets – in addition to being efficient and safe. New Zealand depends on the integrity of its clean green brand and the highways are the shop window of the nation and critical to the impression gained by overseas tourists and traders, but also to residents. Legibility of heritage is a sign of identity, protectiveness and cultural maturity. Key elements that should be revealed are geo-morphology, indigenous biota, Maori and colonial culture. This can be achieved through conservation, restoration and interpretation. Engagement with communities, iwi, engineers and ecologists is crucial, and culture change has to be championed at the highest level. Leadership must reinforce the latent interest in asserting an Aotearoa New Zealand identity.

Research Report 308 Environmental impact of industrial by-products in road construction – a literature review

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The objectives of this project, undertaken 2005/6, were to:

review the international technical literature on the topic of environmental issues relating to the use of waste and industrial by-products in road construction applications, and
recommend a set of guidelines to allow road controlling authorities and environmental agencies to determine if various waste or environmental by-products are appropriate for use in road construction. The international literature shows that the topic of environmental impact is extremely complex and, by necessity, any assessment strategy needs to be relatively conservative for it to be practical, cost effective and reliable. The study has shown that a number of documents that address the issues of hazardous substances and acceptance criteria for contaminants are currently available in New Zealand. A new assessment process has been suggested as a result of the literature review.

Research Report 388 Reconstruction of coal tar contaminated roads by in-situ recycling using foamed bitumen stabilisation

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Coal tar-derived roading material contains over 1000 times more polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) than equivalent bitumen pavements and has been identified as a major source of PAHs in both Christchurch and Auckland aquatic receiving environments. Many old streets containing coal tar will soon require reconstruction, and therefore the excavation and potential disposal of contaminated road construction layers represents a significant financial and environmental problem. To address this problem, we evaluated in-situ foamed bitumen (FB)/cement stabilisation as an environmental acceptable method to reuse the contaminated tar road material. Based on contaminant leaching and toxicity, the reuse of tar-contaminated roads as compacted stabilised base material represents minimal risk to the environment. FB decreased PAH leachate concentrations by ca 4–6, although algal toxicity was correlated to leachate copper, which was increased by the co-use of alkaline hydraulic binders.

Research Report 260 Integrated stormwater management guidelines for the New Zealand roading network

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

These guidelines for integrated stormwater management provide guidance on a range of issues relating to the management of stormwater run-off from state highways and local roads in New Zealand, including:

the legal framework within which stormwater management takes place
the management framework (agency responsibilities and management tools)
the gaining of resource consents for stormwater management activities
environmental effects and mitigation measures
best practice engineering methods. Keywords: compliance, design, drainage, environment, erosion, flooding, hydrology, legislation, maintenance, management, mitigation, monitoring, New Zealand, resource consents, Resource Management Act, run-off, sedimentation, stormwater

Research Report 457 Determination of personal exposure to traffic pollution while travelling by different modes

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This purpose of this project is to assess the comparative risk associated with exposure to traffic pollution when travelling via different transport modes in New Zealand cities. Concentrations of the key traffic-related pollutants (particulate matter: (PM): PM10, PM2. 5, PM1; ultrafine particles (UFPs) and carbon monoxide (CO)) were simultaneously monitored on pre-defined routes in Auckland and Christchurch during the morning and evening commute on people travelling by car, bus, on-road bike, train (Auckland only) and off-road bike (Christchurch only) from February to May 2009. The key results of this research are:

• Car drivers are consistently exposed to the highest average levels of CO. • On-road cyclists are exposed to higher levels of CO, PM1 and UFPs than off-road cyclists. • Car drivers and bus passengers are exposed to higher average levels of UFP than cyclists.

Research Report 132 Environmental management for roading contractors: III. Provisional guidelines for environmental management during road works

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This project was undertaken in 1997–98 to prepare two sets of provisional environmental guidelines for roading contractors carrying out road works in New Zealand. Objectives of the project were to:

provide specific and simple policies and guidelines about the environmental effects of road works, particularly those related to construction, and aimed for use by roading contractors
assist roading contractors to understand the environment within which they work, and 
improve the environmental image of roading contractors. The results of the project are presented as three reports:

Section I - Overview and case study 
Section II - Provisional guidelines for erosion and sediment management during road works
Section III - Provisional guidelines for environmental management during road works (on this page). This first report consists of an overview and a case study with an associated environmental effects assessment used to develop the guidelines.

Research Report 393 Relative costs and benefits of modal transport solutions

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report describes the outcomes of a study commissioned by the NZ Transport Agency to inform local authorities about the costs and benefits of transport modes. The aim of the study has been to provide general advice on the relative cost and benefits of alternatives with a focus on passenger transport in urban areas. The report looks at issues decision makers face in estimating costs, and sets out an approach to providing estimates. This approach provides parameter values such as cost per vehicle kilometre, which can then be applied to the number of vehicles and the distance they travel, so readers may tailor comparisons to their own situation. This quantitative exercise is supplemented by contextual discussion of some important issues in urban transport including drivers of the transport mix, the relationship between land use and transport planning, and road space and traffic management.
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