Skip to content

Access keys for nzta.govt.nz

  • h Home
  • m Menu
  • 0 Show list of access keys
  • 2 Skip to content
  • 3 Skip to top

Resources

Filter by:

Results

Sort by: Relevancy | Date | Title

Displaying Page 1 of 9

Research Report 018 Land transport pricing for New Zealand

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

As part of the management of the land transport system of New Zealand, a study of land transport pricing policies, with particular emphasis on road pricing, has been carried out. The study comprised a review of relevant literature and the development of a proposed land transport pricing research programme for New Zealand. The report of this study consists of three parts:

a description of the current structure and pricing of land transport infrastructure in New Zealand
a review of the literature on land transport pricing to identify the principles underlying transport pricing policies and current and proposed policies from other countries, and
the identification of a proposed land transport pricing research programme for New Zealand.

Research Report 243 An integrated traffic model for Auckland cities

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This study carried out in 1999–2002, attempted to demonstrate and quantify benefits of an integrated approach to traffic signalisation and management of urban street networks that straddle boundaries of Transit New Zealand and Local Authority jurisdictions. A methodology based on two traffic simulation computer models, TRANSYT11 and AIMSUN2, was tested. Salient aspects of the methodology are discussed and relevant issues identified. The methodology was applied to an assessment of the performance of a street network in the Auckland region (Manukau City), New Zealand. The analysis predicted potential improvements were achievable when one of the traffic management improvement techniques was used.  However, because of the large number and complexity of developmental issues, and the incompatibility of the two programs, the methodology was assessed as unsuitable as a practical tool for local road controlling authorities. Keywords: AIMSUN2, modelling, New Zealand, road, safety, traffic, traffic control, traffic models, TRANSYT11, VISSIM, VISUM

Research Report 373 Trends in trip chaining and tours: analysing changes in New Zealanders travel patterns using the Ongoing New Zealand household travel survey

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report describes the 2008/09 reformulation of the 2004–07 Ongoing New Zealand Household Travel Survey trips database into trip chains and tours. The reformulation required us to re-create programming sequences for key elements of the new datasets (segments, trip chains, tours, main mode and main purpose, and three different tour classification schemes) based on previous reformulation of the 1997/98 New Zealand Household Travel Survey dataset. The reformulated datasets permitted us to compare New Zealanders’ travel patterns in 1997/98 and over 2004–07. Thus, we can comment on some trends in New Zealander’s travel behaviour. Comparing the 2004–07 and 1997/98 datasets revealed that:

The mean number of trip chains per day (2. 3) and the mean number of tours per day (1. 3) were essentially unchanged. Both trip chains and tours were increasingly likely to have fewer segments.

Research Report 374 Comparisons of NZ and UK trips and parking rates

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Trip generation, parking demand, modal split and travel activity related to different land uses are fundamental information for transportation planning and land use planning, now and in the future. While trip generation related to residential, business, tourism, recreation, industry and rural activities has been investigated, these areas have not always been surveyed or analysed consistently or reported in sufficient detail to provide transportation professionals with a robust assessment for planning and design purposes. This investigation sought to establish whether trip making and parking demand were similar between similar land uses in New Zealand and the United Kingdom. The conclusion is that travel patterns over a wide range of land uses, and especially those related to retail shopping centre activities, are similar in both countries. The analysis includes retail, service stations, restaurants, fast food, business parks, manufacturing, warehousing, medical centres, preschools and residential activities. Many characteristics are shared.

Research Report 241 Research into traffic peak spreading

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

A research study was undertaken, in 2001–02, for New Zealand and in other countries, of the temporal spreading of traffic peaks, or 'peak spreading', on roads in urban areas. The objectives of the study are to:

review available evidence of, and research into, traffic peak spreading obtained from cities in New Zealand and elsewhere
examine the effect of traffic peak spreading on modelling and evaluation. The two major purposes of the report are to:

describe the phenomenon of peak spreading, why it happens, why it is important, and where it has been observed in the world;
assess how peak spreading, given its importance, has been incorporated in new scheme appraisals by various governments and how it has been represented in modelling and evaluation. Recommendations for incorporating peak spreading as an integral part of transport planning are made.

Research Report 193 Valuation of travel time savings – market research

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This project involved market research among motorists in New Zealand to establish unit behavioural values of travel time savings under a range of conditions, for application in the evaluation of transport projects. Interviews involved a series of 'stated choice' games, in which respondents chose between a recent (reference) trip as car driver and two alternative trips, which differed in terms of various trip attributes (total travel time, degree of congestion, uncertainty of arrival time, fuel costs and toll charges). A series of multinomial logit models was estimated to identify the value of each trip attribute. Unit values of travel time savings for car drivers in a range of conditions were derived, in particular according to trip length and purpose, degree of congestion, and uncertainty of arrival time. The values derived were compared against those currently used for project evaluation purposes and recommendations were made.

Research Report 328 Park and ride: characteristics and demand forecasting

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report examines the characteristics of park and ride (P&R) useage and suggests demand modelling methodologies based on these characteristics for changes in demand at existing sites, and estimation of demand at new sites. It reviews New Zealand and international evidence on the nature of P&R usage and the factors that influence it. The report then examines potential P&R modelling methodologies and identifies the most appropriate within a New Zealand context. Emphasis is given to the development of P&R catchments and resulting regional and site-specific modelling approaches. Finally methodologies are applied to a New Zealand situation and conclusions drawn.

Research report 394 Development and application of a New Zealand car ownership and traffic forecasting model

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research investigated improved methods for forecasting car ownership and use in New Zealand. It compiled and reviewed current data and information on car ownership and use. From this data an aggregate car ownership model for New Zealand was developed. This model predicts that economic conditions and car prices will have a significant impact on future car ownership. A future framework for forecasting car ownership and use in New Zealand was developed, based on reviewing current New Zealand practice, international practice and by undertaking a user needs survey. The resulting recommended long-term framework is a national static disaggregate model. A short- to medium-term framework was also developed which provides an intermediate step to address some of the current shortcomings in New Zealand practices. The research was primarily undertaken in 2007/08.

Research Report 197 Development of benefit parameter research approaches

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This project developed market research techniques for deriving improved values for the unit benefit parameters specified by Transfund New Zealand for use in transport project evaluation throughout New Zealand. It focused on the use of stated preference and related techniques for the valuation of parameters for which market-based valuations are not available: particular attention was paid to level of service and travel time parameters. The project included:

appraisal of techniques used in selected countries to derive unit benefit parameters for use in transprt project evaluation
review of international developments and experience in the use of stated preference and similar techniques, including appraisal of experimental design methods
development of recommendations on research approaches and survey methods for deriving improved unit benefit parameters in the New Zealand context. Keywords: travel time valuation, level of service, environmental valuation, stated preference, stated choice, conjoint analysis, valuation methods, transport evaluation, New Zealand

Research Report 329 Impediments to walking as a mode choice

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Conducted in 2005, this study evaluates a case-control design of contrasts between walkers and drivers to address factors influencing the uptake of walking as a mode choice. With samples drawn from Auckland and Wellington, New Zealand, this research uses a 62-item survey to examine a number of factors: fear of crime; trip-chaining/car dependency; weather; distance/time; social pressure, fatigue and fitness, parking charges, enjoyment of walking, inconvenience, and geography. To avoid factors such as car dependency or the inability to walk, participants are selected because they live a short distance from public transport parking facilities. The group of drivers demonstrate an irregular break in car dependency by driving their cars to the station in order to use public transport. The results indicate that for parking facilities, convenience creates demand. Poor weather has an influence on the decision to drive, and fine weather improves the likelihood of walking.
Top