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Research Report 660 Factors affecting cycling levels of service

Published: | Category: Inclusive access , Research programme , Research & reports | Audiences: General, Walkers & cyclists

This report examines cyclists’ perceptions of cycle infrastructure levels of service and proposes an assessment methodology for evaluating the level of service provided by cycling facilities. First, a range of methodologies for evaluation cycling levels of service are described. These are diverse in both their approach and foundations, ranging from tools that are based exclusively upon expert opinion and judgement, to those that rely on user perceptions of infrastructure quality. The latter is an ongoing field of research that seeks to understand what is most important to the cyclists who ride on the infrastructure we build, and to those contemplating doing so.

Research Report 661 Travel demand management: strategies and outcomes

Published: | Category: Inclusive access , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Travel demand management (TDM) is a rapidly changing field. This research drew lessons from international practice to inform New Zealand planning and policy decisions. The research findings show that a wide range of strategies are in use internationally and the report summarises some key insights from international TDM practice. Keywords: behaviour change case study, cycling, incentives, mobility management, parking, public transport, transport, travel demand management, walking

Research Report 662 Best practice model for developing legislation

Published: | Category: Inclusive access , Research & reports

The aim of this research was to develop a model to guide the development of land transport regulation in the context of New Zealand’s public safety regulatory environment. The research found legislation tends to reflect a particular moment in time. Regulatory failures often share common factors, from which we can learn. New Zealand’s regulators tend to work within constraints that impede their ability to develop flexible regulation for rapidly changing conditions. The report proposes a systems model for regulatory design. Keywords: developing legislation, regulatory design, regulatory failures, regulatory tools, transport safety

Research Report 666 Social impact assessment of mode shift

Published: | Category: Inclusive access , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research was commissioned to inform decision-makers about the social impacts of mode shift, and to enhance the likelihood that benefits will be equitably shared. The report finds that a greater understanding of existing inequities in transport resources and access to opportunities can help to target mode shift policies so that they contribute to achieving optimal transport outcomes and wellbeing for all. Keywords: distributional impacts, equity, mode shift, New Zealand, social impacts, transport appraisal, Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Research Report 667 Developing methodologies for improving customer levels of service for walking

Published: | Category: Inclusive access , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research was commissioned as there is currently a gap in terms of national models and tools that provide customer levels of service information regarding the walkability of New Zealand’s transport networks. The research aimed to determine the key factors that contribute to the quality and attractiveness of the pedestrian network, and to incorporate those in a consistent framework to inform the planning, design and operation of transport systems. The report contains a Pedestrian Level of Service (PLOS) Framework that is applicable for network, street and journey assessments.  

Keywords: access, level of service, pedestrian design, pedestrian planning, safety, walkability

Research Note 002 COVID-19 transport behaviour change

Published: | Category: Inclusive access , Research programme , COVID-19 , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research gathered information from a global search to help identify how changes in behaviour resulting from COVID-19 and the response to it have impacted transport demand, and how these changed behaviours can be mitigated or maintained as desired. First published July 2020
Update 1 added August 2020
Update 2 added October 2020
Keywords: active transport, behaviour change, COVID-19, pandemic, public transport, recovery, remote working

Research Note 003 pedestrian levels of service qualitative report

Published: | Category: Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

There is currently a gap in terms of robust national models and tools that provide customer levels of service information regarding the ‘walkability’ of our pedestrian networks. Decision makers need better information from the perspective of people as pedestrians or public transport users. The priority factors for a positive pedestrian experience are the need to relax, and there are two overarching factors that contribute to a positive pedestrian environment and a relaxing experience – safety and amenity. The research has informed research report RR 667 – Developing methodologies for improving customer levels of service for walking which is available at www. nzta. govt. nz/resources/research/reports/667

Keywords: walkability, pedestrian, levels of service, networks.

Research Report 663 The New Zealand public’s readiness for connected- and autonomous-vehicles (including driverless), car and ridesharing schemes and the social impacts of these

Published: | Category: Inclusive access , Research programme , Research & reports | Audiences: Electric vehicle motorists, General, Motorists

This research was commissioned to provide Waka Kotahi and the Ministry of Transport with information about the New Zealand public’s readiness to adopt four key mobility changes: autonomous vehicles, connected vehicle technology, car sharing, and ride sharing schemes.    

The research found that New Zealanders have a good knowledge of CAVs and app-based ridesharing, but few have heard about ridesharing and carsharing schemes. There are also widespread safety concerns alongside issues of availability, cost and convenience. However, comparisons with international data suggest that at the time of writing this report the New Zealand public was more aware and ready to use CAVs than some overseas jurisdictions. Keywords: attitudes, autonomous vehicles, carsharing, connected vehicles, mobility as a service, ridesharing

Research Report 674 Mode shift to micromobility

Published: | Category: Inclusive access , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The performance of the transport network can be improved by anticipating the impacts of new micro-mobility technologies and how the introduction of new modes may be managed to optimise benefits.  

In this research transport modelling, based on several assumptions about micro-mobility, suggested higher usage of shared paths and separated cycle facilities than for forecasts of push-bikes alone. The growth in availability and ownership of micro-mobility may also lead to increase in public transport patronage as a result of first mile/last mile micro-mobility use.  

Keywords: bike, e-scooter, first/last mile, micromobility, mode share, mode shift, shared mobility, sustainable transportation

Research Report 676 Latent demand for walking and cycling

Published: | Category: Inclusive access , Research programme , Research & reports

This research was undertaken to help inform network planning for walking or cycling which is commonly undertaken with limited evidence or unreliable data. The research produced a stocktake and assessment of methodologies for estimating latent demand for walking and cycling and a ‘decision tree’ that can be used to identify the most appropriate modelling approach, or approaches. Keywords: behaviour, cycling, latent demand, methods, model, walking