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Research Report 649 Great Kiwi road trips: enhancing New Zealand’s tourism industry through better visitor journeys

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the expectations, motivations, experiences, information preferences and behaviour of visitors (both domestic and international) travelling on New Zealand’s transport network. Such knowledge enables a multi-agency approach combining tourism, heritage and transport to identify ways to monitor and improve visitor travel experiences, grow tourism and consequently promote regional economic gain. To do this, a pilot visitor travel survey was trialled, including an information-based intervention. The purpose of this was to capture unique visitor travel behaviour information, and to test a method to deliver during-trip information in a fun, interactive format, using motivation theory and gamification methods to promote different visitor experiences in an intervention group (compared with a control group).

Research Report 336 Watercutting – investigating the lifecycle of watercutter rejuvenation of aggregates

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

There are many techniques for restoring pavement surface microtexture after levels have become deficient. An innovative method, ultra high-pressure (UHP) watercutting is capable of restoring both the microtexture and the macrotexture on polished surfaces as an alternative to traditional resurfacing treatments such as chipsealing. Preliminary investigations of both laboratory samples and road trial sections have shown that UHP watercutting can restore the microtexture of polished aggregate to a level similar to that of freshly crushed aggregate. The UHP watercutter combines a truck mounted UHP pump, water supply and vacuum recovery system with an independently operated umbilical deckblaster. A rotating spraybar fitted with specialised nozzles directs very fine jets of UHP water at ultrasonic velocity on to the road surface.

Research Report 351 The effect of adding recycled glass on the performance of basecourse aggregate

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Glass bottles collected by councils are forming large stockpiles, particularly in the South Island, as it is uneconomic to transport the glass to the Auckland plant for recycling. An alternative method of disposal would be to crush the glass and mix it into basecourse aggregate. NZ Transport Agency currently allows up to 5% by mass of crushed glass to be mixed in the aggregate. This study investigated the effect on aggregate performance of percentages of crushed glass up to a maximum of 50% by mass of aggregate or a third of the total mass. Performance was measured using the repeated load triaxial apparatus and associated rut depth modelling to determine the number of heavy axles until 10 mm of rutting occurred within the aggregate layer.

Research Report 157 Measuring and enhancing roadside biodiversity

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

A new method of biodiversity assessment is developed to characterise the biodiversity values of roads across New Zealand. The methodology blends rigorous probability sampling and PNAP sampling methodology with environmental domains analyses to characterise the biodiversity attributes of highways. It demonstrates the usefulness of this methodology in allowing regional reporting and integrating biodiversity conservation with road management by applying it to a particular road segment, State Highway 3 from Hamilton to New Plymouth. The data gathered is also used to develop an overall biodiversity enhancement and restoration plan for the studied segment of road. The biodiversity attributes of the road reserve differed markedly between the environmental sectors, and showed a strong effect from the surrounding land cover. Results indicate that the road reserve is both a biodiversity asset and a liability.

Research Report 479 The economic and land use impacts of transformational transport investment

Published: | Category: Economic development , Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The purpose of this research, which was undertaken between July 2010 and June 2011, was to develop, test and recommend additional methodologies that could be used to quantify the economic productivity and land use impacts when assessing transformational or structural transport investments over time. Currently there is a knowledge gap in this area and the intention was to develop a more strategic approach to assist in gaining greater value for money from future transport investments. We investigated how it might be possible to get a forward-looking view of the productivity and land use changes associated with transformational transport investments. In our view, the retrospective case study approach can be used to provide a predictive tool to assess land use and productivity effects of transformational transport investments. One key factor that enables this is that the tool is intended to be employed at the project inception phase.

Research Report 224 Environmental protection measures on NZ state highway roading projects – volume 1: reference guide to past practice

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This project was undertaken in 2001 to review environmental protection measures that have been applied through the Resource Management Act (RMA) process, to a sample of 35 state highway roading projects constructed in New Zealand, between the years 1991 and 2001. The results of the project are presented as two reports:

Volume 1: reference guide to past practice (on this page)
Volume 2: key issues and observations from the study
The investigation takes a retrospective look at these projects to find out (using site visits, file searches and interviews with original participants) how the protection measure performed. Volume 1 is presented in the form of a reference guide to past practice in the management of environmental impacts of roading and contains sections dealing with such issues as sediment control, noise, effects on fish, weed control, landscaping etc.

Research Report 219 Recycling of materials for more sustainable road construction

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research project examined the economic, structural and attitudinal impediments to the recycling of materials in roading in New Zealand. It found that, although several materials (eg asphalt, tyres, waste oil, base course and aggregates from crushed concrete) could be recycled, little (excepting some base course) is recycled into New Zealand roads at present. The structural process of specifications, tender evaluation and risk sharing are major impediments, along with the lack of knowledge of and experience with recycling withing the roading industry in New Zealand. However, the industry believes it could quickly develop recycling and build its expertise if a supportive structural process was established. Based on industry input and a review of international recycling initiatives, recommendations to overcome these impediments are proposed. Keywords: asphalt, construction and demolition waste, impediments, New Zealand, policy, recycling, specification

Research Report 590 Impacts of exposure to dust on unsealed roads

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The primary purpose of this research was to improve our understanding of the impacts that dust emissions from unsealed roads have on people and investigate dust mitigation measures. The project’s key research objectives were:

Characterise the dust and quantify the impacts of dust from unsealed roads on people. Determine the effectiveness and cost of dust mitigation measures. Estimate the costs of the health impacts of dust and estimate the benefits of mitigating the dust. Propose a methodology to support decision making about mitigation options. A two month road dust monitoring campaign was undertaken on a section of Mataraua Road, 10km southwest of Kaikohe in the Far North District, during February, March and April 2015. The monitoring results indicated that potential adverse human health impacts might occur due to the dust discharged from untreated unsealed roads.

Research Report 221 A methodology for assessing the biodiversity of road networks: a New Zealand case study

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The public road network makes an extensive and unique contribution to the public lands of New Zealand. It has a total area greater than our fifth largest national park, and connects and bisects New Zealand's towns and landscapes. While the main purposes of road construction and management are transport efficiency and safety, significant benefit can be obtained by enhancing other aspects of the road reserve, such as its biodiversity or scenic values, and reducing the negative impacts of the road and roading activities on the surrounding areas. This report, researched in 1999–2001, describes a methodology for characterising the biodiversity assets and liabilities of road networks using a combination of rigorous probability sampling, modern spatial analysis, and descriptive surveys. Digital highway skeletons were developed of the Waikato Region (North Island, New Zealand) state highway network to depict important road attributes and environmental characteristics of roads and road reserves.

Research Report 152 Field evaluation of catchbasin insert performance

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Studies carried out (between 1992 and 1995) on stormwater quality in Auckland Region, New Zealand, reveal that suspended solids, heavy metals (such as lead, copper and zinc), and petroleum-based hydrocarbons are present in significant concentrations in stormwater. The main source of these contaminants is the transport system, including run-off from roads and emissions from vehicles. A catchbasin-insert device designed to trap stormwater sediments in run-off from roads was tested and evaluated for improving stormwater quality in selected catchbasins in the Auckland Region. The project demonstrated that the devices were effective in removing sediments from stormwater, and may promote the removal of contaminants that are sorbed onto sediment surfaces because they cause increased detention of sediments that would otherwise have been discharged to receiving waters. Keywords: catchbasin, contaminants, devices, Auckland, New Zealand, pollution, run-off, roads, stormwater, transport