COVID-19 SERVICES UPDATE: Information for all alert levels, Waka Kotahi services and more

SCAM ALERTS: Refund email and Vehicle licence (rego) renewal phishing emails

ONLINE SERVICES: We currently have an issue with receiving some payments and are working to resolve this issue as quickly as possible. We apologise for any inconvenience.

EASTER WEEKEND – PLAN AHEAD: Heading away for the long weekend? Check our holiday journeys tool(external link)

Resources

Filter by:

Results

Sort by: Relevancy | Date | Title

Displaying Page 7 of 7

Research Report 016 Economic disbenefits of dust from unsealed roads

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Potential economic disbenefits of dust emission from unsealed roads impact on crop production, animal food supply and health, accident potential, property values and maintenance costs, vehicle operating costs and personal health. A literature survey concentrating on overseas literature has found that very little information of a quantified nature is available. Moreover, transferring the results of some of the work on dust generation carried out in developing countries is difficult because if differences in climate and road materials. By including some New Zealand studies, it was concluded that the most significant potential disbenefits from dust emissions arise from a reduction in crop yield and possibly [an increase] to vehicle operating costs. Keywords: Accidents, agriculture, clothing, communities, dust, economic disbenefits, environment, health, horticulture, housing, insurance, land values, palliatives, people, pollution, roads, road surfaces, tourism, travel times, unsealed roads, vehicle operating costs, vehicle wear, visibility

Research Report 292 Road traffic noise: determining the influence of New Zealand road surfaces on noise levels and community annoyance

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Road traffic noise is a major cause of environmental concern in New Zealand. The effect that the road surface has on noise is the one major influence that the roading authority can control. International literature and road noise models to date have considered that, for speeds below 60 km/h, tyre/surface noise does not have a significant effect (1–2 dBA) on road noise. Current thought is that a 3 dBA noise level change is just noticeable to most people, which makes the widely observed increases in community annoyance from road resealing hard to explain. This research investigates the effect that road surface type has on road traffic noise at urban driving speeds (50 km/h) and the consequent effect on community annoyance. It then offers guidance on road surface selection, with regards to noise.

Research Report 236 Resource consent procedures for road maintenance works in New Zealand

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This project examines the costs and benefits of, and alternatives to, the resource consent process of the Resource Management Act 1991 in circumstances where the process has been applied to routine maintenance works on New Zealand state highways. The study is based on an historical review of 195 previous consents issued over a five-year period (1997 to 2001). The study, carried out in 2001–2002, finds that maintenance works are not always uncontentious. Issues can and do arise through the consent process. Forty-one such issues are reported from previous consents. Some minor environmental benefits resulted. The total cost of the 195 consents reviewed in the study is estimated to have been $560,000 (an average of $2,900 per consent). These costs appear to have increased over time (by about 30% between 1997 and 2001). The study recommends that future effort be directed at the development of maintenance-friendly regional rules.

Research Report 225 Environmental protection measures on NZ state highway roading projects – volume 2: key issues and observations from the study

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This project was undertaken in 2001 to review environmental protection measures that have been applied through the Resource Management Act (RMA) process, to a sample of 35 state highway roading projects constructed in New Zealand, between the years 1991 and 2001. The results of the project are presented as two reports:

Volume 1: reference guide to past practice
Volume 2: key issues and observations from the study (on this page)
The investigation takes a retrospective look at these projects to find out (using site visits, file searches and interviews with original participants) how the protection measure performed. Volume 1 is presented in the form of a reference guide to past practice in the management of environmental impacts of roading and contains sections dealing with such issues as sediment control, noise, effects on fish, weed control, landscaping etc.

Research Report 360 Residual binder extraction from emulsions for quality assurance testing

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Safety and environmental drivers are pushing the New Zealand road construction industry away from hot, cutback binders and towards the use of emulsified bitumen as the delivery medium for chipseal binders. However, there is no agreed standard method for recovery and testing of the emulsified binder. The absence of such a method could potentially lead to dispute over the quality and contractual compliance of emulsified binders due to the effects of differing laboratory techniques for binder extraction and sample preparation. This research project reviews techniques used worldwide and recommends a method suitable for New Zealand materials and conditions. Results from the trials of the new test method show that, in spite of completing the extraction of the binder under conditions similar to those encountered in the field, the binder must be reheated to remove water and air from the test sample.

Research Report 306 Assessing the environmental effect of new and recycled materials in road construction

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The introduction of new or alternative (recycled wastes) materials in road construction may have benefits in terms of cost reductions, improved surfacing or pavement performance. However, it is essential to ensure that such innovations do not result in long-term negative impacts on the environment eg through the leaching of toxic chemicals into waterways. The aim of this research, conducted in 2005–2006, was to develop guidelines to provide assistance to New Zealand roading authorities, roading contractors and suppliers when deciding whether to approve, or seek approval for, new or recycled materials for road construction. The guidelines do not consider environmental impacts, such as sediment runoff, which are associated specifically with construction activities. Guidelines for minimising environmental impacts during construction have been published previously and will also apply to construction activities using new or recycled materials.

Research report 485 Ground vibration from road construction

Published: | Category: Environmental impacts of land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

There is an increasing requirement to control and manage ground vibrations generated by road construction and maintenance activities through project specific construction management plans. The objective is to minimise any potential adverse effects. The ability to reliably estimate vibration levels of specific construction activities at the project planning stage and to assess their likely effect on structures and their occupants is therefore required. Typical vibration characteristics for various activities, including site preparation, dynamic compaction and piling were measured for representative equipment and soil types to obtain baseline values for use in preconstruction assessments and to enable validation of available prediction methods. A review of international standards was also undertaken leading to two proposed criteria against which predicted vibrations can be assessed for damage and human perception.