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Displaying Page 3 of 9

Research Report 140 Passenger transport contracting issues: output-based funding and area contracts

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The report develops and analyses proposals for output-based funding (OBF) for passenger transport, including implications of output-based contracts, and the use of subsidised deregulation. Particular attention is given to reviewing area-based contracts as compared with route-based. It is concluded that OBF is likely to improve delivery of regional council objectives with regard to better meeting customer needs and increasing patronage. Keywords: output based funding, subsidised deregulation, passenger transport, contracts

Research Report 533 Economic appraisal of public transport service enhancements

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research project was undertaken to provide guidance on appropriate methods and benefits parameters to use in the economic appraisal of public transport proposals (in particular service enhancements) in New Zealand. The research involved two focus areas and a case study. The first focus area included an international review of economic and project appraisal approaches and procedures, followed by a detailed assessment of selected international appraisal procedures. The second focus area involved a comprehensive review of existing New Zealand and Australian research evidence on public transport user benefit parameter values. Finally, a case study based on the Wellington public transport spine study short list evaluation was undertaken to illustrate the potential application of recommended improvements to economic appraisal procedures and recommended user benefit parameter values.

Research Report 339 Measurement valuation of public transport reliability

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Reliability in public transport is important for operators and passengers alike. Reliability can affect users in one of two ways: as a delay when picking up the passenger and as a delay when the passenger is on the service. Reliability measures are typically used within performance regimes to evaluate the quality of service of public transport providers. This research, carried out in 2007, aims to find a method of measuring the value placed on public transport reliability in different contexts in New Zealand. As part of this project, a stated preference survey was designed and implemented to collect information about passengers’ current public transport usage, their attitudes to reliability and how they valued reliability. Using these stated preference surveys, four initial models were estimated: a disaggregate model, a mean model, a variance model and a mean-variance model.

Research Report 338 Developing school-based cycle trains in New Zealand

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

A cycle train is similar in approach to the ‘walking school bus’ – adult volunteer ‘conductors’ cycle along a set route to school, collecting children from designated ‘train stops’ along the way. They are well established in Belgium and are beginning to appear in the United Kingdom. Previous research in New Zealand found a high level of interest in the cycle train concept, leading us to design and conduct a trial for implementing cycle train networks here. Using the process and resource materials we developed after extensive consultation with key government stakeholders, six cycle trains were launched in Nelson in September 2006. Most of these cycle trains proved to be self-sustaining, even after the two-month summer break. In fact, the programme expanded – in early 2007, another school engaged the process and set up a cycle train, and two further cycle trains were established in the trial schools.

Research report 467 National travel profiles part B: trips, trends and travel prediction

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Using data held within the New Zealand Household Travel Survey (NZHTS), this research examined changes in travel behaviour between 2003 and 2010 and sought to determine whether travel behaviours such as journey times, mode choice, trip complexity and trip generation rates differed by area type and region. A key aim of the research was to unlock further value from the data for the benefit of transport planners and engineers. The research explored the extent to which NZHTS data could be used in a predictive context and examined a method to extract and arrange the NZHTS data into a form that would allow practitioners to quickly undertake a range of enquiries based on user-specified variables such as car ownership and household compositions to reveal area-specific travel behaviours.

Research Report 209 Trips and parking related to land use – volume 1: report

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The objectives of this research project were to produce a comprehensive national database of information on trips and parking related to land use in New Zealand since 1990, to identify trends that have occurred since the 1970s, and to compare the New Zealand results with those reported in American and Australian publications. The research project took place in New Zealand between 1998 and 2001. It found that there has been a general increase in total traffic by a factor of 2. 2 during the last 30 years but that, while for some land-use activities (education, hospitals, medical centres, large service stations) there has been a considerable increase, for most there has been little change.

Research Report 014 Total mobility scheme: influences on costs and usage

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The New Zealand Total Mobility Scheme is a nationwide project to assist with provision of transportation for people with disabilities that preclude their use of public transport. Findings related to the costs of, and external influences on, the New Zealand Total Mobility Scheme are discussed. Field work was carried out predominantly in Auckland, although information from other regions was also obtained. A total of 62 people from local voluntary agencies (and in some cases, from their national executive), transport organisations, local authorities and Government organisations were interviewed. This approach was supplemented by relevant reports, legislation, formal policies and practice guiedlines where available. Information was analysed to assess the cost and ridership impact on the Total Mobility Scheme.

Research report 417 Auditing public transport accessibility in New Zealand

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research project, conducted in 2007–09, reviewed international best practice for auditing public transport (PT) accessibility, and developed and piloted a New Zealand-specific PT accessibility audit methodology. The accessibility audit and report card takes a 'whole-of-journey' approach to accessibility, thus including: service coverage, accessing information about the services; getting to the service; paying for the service; getting on board; enjoying the ride; getting to the final destination (where people want to go, when they want to get there); and making the return trip. Affordability of the service has been excluded from the current audit and report card. The audit uses a simple yes/no checklist to assess accessibility factors and summarises these in a report card which tallies the number of 'barriers to access' rated as 'severe' (3), 'moderate' (2) and 'slight' (1) on the route/corridor for each of six PT user categories.

Research Report 353 National travel profiles – part A: description of daily travel patterns

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Gaining a thorough understanding of daily travel for all trip purposes and by all modes of travel is essential to policy and planning. The Ministry of Transport’s New Zealand Home Travel Surveys (NZHTS) have, since 2003, been undertaken as continuous ongoing surveys. The dataset resulting from these years of survey include 13 000 people from 6000 households. This large database is a valuable resource covering accidents and safety issues as well as travel profiles. The national statistics are broken down into major and secondary urban areas, and also rural areas as the basis of reporting and presentation. This report makes this information more readily available to researchers and practitioners involved with transportation. The report provides a wide range of tables and graphs relating to modes, purposes and trip legs for weekdays and weekend travel.

Research Report 054A National traffic database – Research report

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The National Traffic Database (NTDB) is a system for storing traffic data on each of approximately 120,000 sections of New Zealand public road network (state highways and local roads). It incorporates data collected by each Road Controlling Authority (RCA), ie by Transit New Zealand Regional Offices for state highways and by each Territorial Authority (TA) for local roads. The road sections are as defined in the RAMM (Road Assessment and Maintenance Management system) databases of each RCA. It describes the relative traffic demand on New Zealand public roads, in terms of traffic volume (ie annual average daily traffic or AADT), traffic composition by vehicle class and by vehicle weight. Such a compilation of these data does not appear to have been made elsewhere in the world.
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