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Displaying Page 4 of 9

Research Report 054B National traffic database – Quality plan

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The National Traffic Database (NTDB) is a system for storing traffic data on each of approximately 120,000 sections of New Zealand public road network (state highways and local roads). It incorporates data collected by each Road Controlling Authority (RCA), ie by Transit New Zealand Regional Offices for state highways and by each Territorial Authority (TA) for local roads. The road sections are as defined in the RAMM (Road Assessment and Maintenance Management system) databases of each RCA. It describes the relative traffic demand on New Zealand public roads, in terms of traffic volume (ie annual average daily traffic or AADT), traffic composition by vehicle class and by vehicle weight. Such a compilation of these data does not appear to have been made elsewhere in the world.

Research Report 569 Public transport and the next generation

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

There is an increased use of public transport among Generation Y compared with previous generations, but there is limited information on the specific factors related to this trend and whether demand is temporary, sustained, or growing. A multi-method approach was undertaken to better understand travel demand for Generation Y with:

an analysis of New Zealand datasets to examine historical travel behaviour trends
in-depth qualitative focus groups to better understand some of the drivers, barriers, and key life stages where travel changes are likely to occur
a national quantitative survey of 1,191 travellers to identify predicted future use of public transport and the prioritisation of targeted service improvements to better inform policy direction and investment strategies.  
Findings indicate there will be large, sustained growth in public (and active) transport use, particularly among Generation Y.

Research Report 616 Assessing the value of public transport as a network

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The development of a comprehensive mechanism for measuring the value of public transport is important to gain a greater understanding of existing networks and plan optimal future networks. Mechanisms for measuring the value of public transport in New Zealand are currently limited and generally only consider financial aspects. Peak services on high-frequency corridors with high patronage generally operate with high efficiency, while other services such as evening or feeder services typically have low fare box recovery, and low perceived efficiency but are likely to contribute to higher passenger numbers elsewhere across the network and in doing so add value to the network as a whole. This research explored the elements that influence the value of a public transport service and developed a framework that extends the NZ Transport Agency’s economic evaluation procedures to consider the contribution of isolated services to the wider network value.

Research Report 548 Literature review of the costs and benefits of traveller information projects

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The NZ Transport Agency selected URS NZ Ltd to conduct a literature review in 2013 to find available cost and benefit information for traveller information systems (TIS) and associated products. The outcome of this literature review will be used as reference material for current traveller information projects and as the basis for future New Zealand TIS projects. This study aims to begin to fill the knowledge gap in the field of TIS and provide detailed information on the costs and benefits associated with the use of TIS. TIS have been accredited with providing various direct and indirect benefits to the end user during day-to-day journeys and on key transport routes during the pre-trip and en route travel stages. The claim is that TIS increases travel efficiency by better utilising the existing transportation network.

Research Report 223 Analysis of patronage data from public transport case studies New Zealand

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

A research project was undertaken in 2001 to analyse the patronage and cost-effectiveness impacts of nine public transport enhancement initiatives (the case studies) in three New Zealand cities (Christchurch, Wellington, Auckland). The patronage impacts and service elasticity values were assessed for each case study, along with an analysis of previous travel mode, patronage growth patterns, synergy effects, and cost effectiveness. Patronage increases were generally greater for new services than for enhancements to existing services, and the service enhancements to existing services were generally not as cost-effective as the new services.  Patronage was found to continue increasing after 12 months, but only by 15–30% over the next three years. The success of a service enhancement scheme can therefore be reasonably judged after 12 months of operation provided allowance is made for the further increase likely beyond this time. Service elasticity values derived were generally within typical internationally reported values.

Research report 414 Bike Now: encouraging cycle commuting in New Zealand

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The aim of the Bike Now research project was to explore specific actions that could be undertaken in the workplace to encourage people to take up (and continue) cycling to work. The actions included: bike mentoring/buddying; establishing 'bike buses'; providing cycle skills training; creating secure parking at the workplace; and providing a cycle fleet at the workplace for travel during working hours, among others. The Bike Now project involved approximately 40 workplaces in Auckland, Wellington, Nelson and Blenheim, New Zealand for a 12-month period in 2007 and 2008. Specially trained coordinators worked with 'champions' within each workplace to identify the initiatives of interest in their particular location (through an online survey of employees), implement them (as was feasible), and then complete a follow-up survey online.

Research report 418 Forecasting the benefits from providing an interface between cycling and public transport

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The integration of cycling and public transport (cycle-PT) can provide additional transport modal choice and flexibility in the use of existing public transport and also increase cycling trips and transit patronage. A model was developed for forecasting demand for bike racks on board public transport and secure storage at stations and terminals in different contexts and for different public transport modes. The NZ Transport Agency's Economic evaluation manual was used to calculate the economic justification in terms of a benefit-to-cost (BCR) ratio for implementing cycle-PT in New Zealand's larger centres. Cycle-PT is economically justified in New Zealand with BCRs from 2 to more than 10 depending on the centre and the scenario. The implementation of cycle-PT in New Zealand's six largest centres could produce more than 1. 7 million cycle-PT trips per annum.

Research report 413 Feasibility study of a national trip-end model for New Zealand

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report presents the findings of a research project to investigate the feasibility of developing a national trip-end model (NTEM) for New Zealand. The rationale for this is to allow policy issues to be addressed nationally in a consistent manner with trip generation, distribution and mode split considered at the national level. The research examined large area models from overseas and concluded that while there were a number of parallels with the 'four-stage' modelling paradigm used in urban areas, there were also a number of differences. If a NTEM were to be developed in New Zealand there are a number of forecasts which could be used for the input variables. On the other hand there is very little trip data available nationally which could be used for calibration so the development of a national model would require a substantial data gathering exercise, either through household or roadside surveys.

Research Report 449 Assessment of the type of cycling infrastructure required to attract new cyclists

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research, which was conducted from July 2008 to January 2010, investigated what type of cycling infrastructure would encourage 'new cyclists' (ie people who either do not currently cycle at all, or people who do not currently cycle for utilitarian trips) to use cycling as their mode of transport for daily activities in New Zealand. The research involved undertaking an international literature review followed by national surveys and Christchurch-based focus groups, to gain an understanding of some of the motivations and barriers associated with utilitarian cycling, and to evaluate a range of cycling facilities. The research showed that safety was the most significant issue for potential cyclists, particularly in relation to vehicle driver behaviour and traffic volume. Other significant issues included having facilities at the destination for showering and changing, enjoyment, and the perception that car drivers are not courteous.

Research Report 191 Traffic growth prediction

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research reviewed the literature on traffic growth prediction in New Zealand and overseas, surveyed local traffic growth forecasting practice in New Zealand, reviewed the traffic growth procedures in the Project Evaluation Manual, and attempted to identify the factors that affect traffic growth and establish to what extent. Although there is a demand locally for guidance in traffic growth prediction, there is no uniformity of approach by roading authorities and a lack of knowledge of how well the current methods work. More needs to be done in areas where growth is significant and/or land use is changing and driving traffic growth. Moreover, commercial freight traffic growth needs to be better modelled and predicted.
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