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The NZ Transport Agency will trial the use of average speed cameras in two locations across Auckland in 2019. Average speed cameras are potentially highly effective and a very fair means of speed management. This trial will provide us with an opportunity to test that potential by gathering hard evidence to assess their effectiveness for improving road safety in New Zealand.

About average speed cameras

The cameras record a vehicle’s average speed between two points along a stretch of road. Tickets are only issued if the average speed over that entire distance exceeds the legal limit.

This gives an accurate reading of whether drivers are speeding over a sustained distance. Average speed camera zones will be clearly marked and publicised, so drivers will have the opportunity to adjust their speed, stay safe and avoid tickets.

About the trial

The average speed camera trial will commence in early 2019 at two locations in Auckland:

  1. The Waterview Tunnels
  2. The Southern Motorway at Papakura

Q+A

Where are the average speed camera trials being conducted?

Two average speed camera trials will be conducted in Auckland: one through the Waterview Tunnels, and one on the Southern Motorway between the SH20/21 connection (at Manukau) and Papakura.

Why were those sites selected?

The Waterview Tunnels operate in a constrained environment where the potential consequences of a crash are catastrophic, and where speeding drivers put everyone using the tunnels at risk. Any crash in the tunnels will affect the efficiency of the roading network for some time before reopening and should therefore be avoided. The safety of workers when they are in the tunnels is a concern that could be better managed by average speed management.

The Southern Motorway project is experiencing regular speeding through a clearly signposted 80km/h worksite, which is putting road workers doing their job at huge risk. This trial will aim to bring those speeds down and keep everyone safe.

What is an average speed camera; how does it work?

An average speed camera (sometimes called a point-to-point camera) records a vehicle’s average speed between two points along a stretch of road, providing an accurate reading of whether drivers are speeding over a sustained distance. Tickets are only issued if the average speed over that entire distance exceeds the legal limit. Overseas experience shows a significant reduction in the number of tickets issued, and also sustained safe speeds on the road network.

Average speed cameras are used extensively overseas and have a track record of saving lives in Australia, the UK and Europe. A UK study found fatal crashes on targeted roads reduced by 46% in three years after implementation.

The cameras are potentially a very effective way to improve safety in areas where high-speed driving puts others at particular risk. This trial will provide an opportunity to test that potential by gathering hard evidence to assess their effectiveness for improving road safety in New Zealand.

Will there be signs indicating that average speed cameras are operating?

Yes. By clearly marking and publicising the average speed zones, drivers will have the opportunity to adjust their speed, stay safe and avoid tickets.

Will tickets be issued during the trial?

Yes, tickets will be issued.

What is the wording of the signs?

The specific wording and sign design are still being agreed, but will follow Australian and international conventions.

When will the trial start?

The trial will commence in 2019.

How long will the trial run for?

The trial will run for twelve months.

When will the results be available?

Results will be available during the trial.

Are there privacy concerns around the use of average speed cameras?

The Transport Agency will ensure that all necessary measures are in place to protect privacy. The same rules will apply to the storage and retention of photographic images and data that apply to other traffic safety cameras. Images of vehicles that have not been detected exceeding the speed limit will not be retained or stored.

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