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Displaying Page 5 of 9

Research Report 045 Tourism benefits from sealing roads: user survey of Milford Sound road

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The benefits from sealing roads on the level of tourism activity and on gross tourism expenditure in New Zealand using, as a case study, the effects of sealing the Milford Sound road are reported. The research, carried out in 1993, involved interviews with tourist organisations in Te Anau and with tour operators who operate into Milford Sound. Some changes in tourist activity as a result of the road sealing have been identified, but changes to tourism expenditure or tourist numbers are not confirmed. Keywords: Bus, coach, Milford Sound, New Zealand, rental cards, roads, tourism, traffic trends, unsealed roads

Research Report 514 The contribution of public transport to economic productivity

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The objective of this research was to quantify the contribution of public transport to economic productivity. Based on our review of the literature we decided to extend and apply Venables’ microeconomic model of the productivity benefits of transport improvements, which considers the interplay between commuting costs and agglomeration economies. We extended Venables’ model in two ways: first, we incorporated non-linear congestion costs that are typical of major urban centres in which public transport tends to operate. Second, we allowed for space previously used for car parking to be reallocated, primarily for employment, which in turn would generate additional agglomeration economies. The model was subsequently applied to two transport case studies and we found additional productivity benefits in the order of 3–19% of conventional transport benefits. These findings have implications for the economic evaluation of public transport improvements and transport funding priorities.

Research Report 387 Optimisation of heavy vehicle performance

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Operational requirements, vehicle dimensions and mass limits, other regulations and road user charges all influence on the type of vehicle used for passenger and freight transport in New Zealand. The aim of this research was to improve the performance of New Zealand’s heavy vehicle fleet in protecting the road and bridge infrastructure, improving safety, reducing environmental impact and reducing congestion. To achieve this aim, typical vehicles used in six transport tasks in New Zealand were benchmarked against vehicles undertaking those same tasks in Australia, Canada, Southeast Asia, and the United Kingdom. The six transport tasks analysed were passenger coach transport, bulk liquids and materials transport, 40 foot ISO intermodal container transport, and livestock and refrigerated goods transport. A more optimal New Zealand truck and full trailer is presented, and ways to optimise other vehicle configurations are discussed.

Research Report 627 Data standards for the NZ transport network

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audiences: General, Road traffic engineers & consultants

As transport network operations become more and more time critical the requirement for knowledge of the performance and state of the network becomes more significant for decision support. Sensor technology is advancing quickly, particularly with respect to the ‘Internet of Things’, and there are significant amounts of data and information generated by a number of internal and external sources that relate to transport network and require processing. An inherent embedded component of the data sources is information about the transport networks themselves. Typically, this spatial attribute is developed to meet the specific needs of an application leading to diverse representations of the same transport network. There is a lack of transport specific data analysis platforms that are resilient to change, are lightweight and cost efficient to maintain.

Research Report 183 Personal travel characteristics of New Zealanders – analysis of home interview survey data

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research project, carried out between 1995–1997, explores the personal travel characteristics of New Zealanders that have been recorded in various household interview surveys (HIS) carried out over the last 30 years. It has brought together all the household interview survey data, both in electronic form and as documents, that are still available in New Zealand. The trip generation rates per person and per household for person trips by mode, vehicle ownership and purpose, and for vehicle driver trips by vehicle ownership and purpose, and for vehicle driver trips by vehicle ownership, purpose, household category, occupancy, duration have been analysed. Also the stability of trip rates both between cities, and within cities over time, has been researched. Keywords: home interview, household, individual, interview, New Zealand, surveys, traffic, travel

Research Report 184 Valuation of public transport attributes

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

A research project was undertaken in 1999/2000 to review international evidence on user valuations of the individual components of public transport journeys, for use in forecasting the demand for and evaluating user benefits of public transport improvement projects. These components covered: walking, waiting and in-vehicle time; transfers between services; travel environment factors (eg comfort, cleanliness, safety); and any mode-specific factors. Recommendations were made in regard to appropriate valuations for application in New Zealand (in the absence of primary market research in New Zealand) and guidance was given in relation to primary market research needs. Keywords: urban public transport, user valuations, journey attributes, user benefits, forecasting demand

Research Report 248 Review of passenger transport demand elasticities

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The report was prepared in 2002 to assess international evidence on elasticities of demand for passenger transport (both public and private) and to recommend elasticity values that could be applied in forecasting the impacts on travel demand of urban transport policy measures in New Zealand. While considerable information is available, both in New Zealand and internationally, on passenger transport demand elasticities, no comprehensive guide exists on appropriate values for use in New Zealand. The project was designed to fill this gap. The research included a review of the international literature on passenger transport demand elasticities, relating to the following:

effects of changes in public transport system variables (principally fares, service levels, in-vehicle time) on public transport demand
effects of changes in private transport system variables (principally in-vehicle travel time, fuel prices, parking charges, toll charges) on both private transport demand and public transport demand.

Research Report 316 Light/medium commercial vehicle use in four urban centres

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This study, undertaken in 2004–2005, explores light to medium commercial vehicle trip patterns in urban areas. We selected four case study corridors: two in the heart of the central business district of a major city (Queen Street, Auckland, and Lambton Quay, Wellington) and two in the main business area of a secondary city (central Takapuna, North Shore City and Central Lower Hutt). We conducted face-to-face interviews with key informants from organisations located within each corridor. Approximately 50 such organisations were interviewed. Given the extensive use of couriers in all four corridors, we also interviewed one non-urgent and one urgent courier company operating in Wellington region.

Research report 506 Identify, evaluate and recommend bus priority interventions

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The purpose of the research topic was to develop a practical decision-assisting tool for identifying appropriate bus priority interventions for any given situation based upon route and intersection characteristics. In developing our proposed methodology the research team was keen to ensure the final product would be an active ‘live’ decision assisting tool available at one’s desktop and not simply a forgettable piece of research landing on a shelf with limited life and audience. With this approach applied throughout the study, the final tool was developed in a manner that is both relevant to today’s situations and takes future scenarios into consideration. The principal objective of this research therefore was to develop an easily disseminated computerised application for practitioners to identify appropriate bus priority treatments.

Research Report 639 Technology related transport skill requirements and availability

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audiences: General, Land developers

This paper reports an assessment of skills gaps and training needs likely in 2035 for New Zealand, resulting from the technological change from implementation of intelligent transport systems (ITS) in land transport. The research reported was funded by the New Zealand Transport Agency and conducted in 2017 in Wellington, New Zealand. The economics and engineering literature provides important insights into the impact of technological change on skills demanded and the consequences for occupations and training. Accordingly, to develop the skills gap assessment, we first developed scenarios of future ITS environments in New Zealand in 2035. This was informed by global literature on ITS technologies and their likely implementation by 2035. Paramount among these technologies were autonomous vehicles, where their level of autonomy and coverage of the national vehicle fleet by 2035, is a useful metric of the overall level of ITS development.
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