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Research Report 510 Evaluation of the C-roundabout an improved multi-lane roundabout design for cyclists

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The C-roundabout (cyclist roundabout) is a new multi-lane roundabout design (developed as part of a 2006 Land Transport NZ research project Improved multi-lane roundabout designs for cyclists) that aims to improve the safety of cyclists at multi-lane roundabouts and make multi-lane roundabouts more cyclist-friendly. A C-roundabout was installed at the Palomino Drive/Sturges Road intersection in Auckland and was evaluated between 2008 and 2011 in terms of its safety, capacity, and the opinions of cyclists, pedestrians and car drivers. The C-roundabout successfully reduced vehicle speeds to 30km/h, which is close to the speed of cyclists. This made the roundabout safer for cyclists, as well as for other road users. The installation of the C-roundabout at this uncongested site had little impact on capacity. It drew positive feedback from cyclists and pedestrians, but about half of the car drivers were not in favour of it.

Research Report 226 Curve advisory speeds in New Zealand

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research project investigated the use of curve advisory speed signs in New Zealand. A literature review identified key issues to examine. Current traffic behaviour at the location of curve advisory speed signs was observed in order to determine effectiveness and compliance. Alternative methods for determining curve advisory speeds, using road geometry data or accelerometer-based systems, were compared with ball-bank surveys. The existing criteria and methods used for setting curve advisory speeds in New Zealand were assessed in light of the above findings, and changes suggested.

Research report 405 Public lighting for safe and attractive pedestrian areas

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The Australian/New Zealand standard Lighting for roads and public spaces, part 3.1: pedestrian area (category P) lighting - performance and design requirements (AS/NZS 1158.3.1:2005) sets out specifications for pedestrian lighting. The standard defines adequate and acceptable pedestrian lighting practices to make walking safe. This research project complements and extends the standard by investigating pedestrian lighting practices to make walking not only safe, but also more attractive. The project highlights issues and perspectives from which to view the effectiveness of the pedestrian lighting. This research is partly based on the observation that most lighting in the public arena has traditionally been driven by the needs of motorists, but pedestrians' needs are different. It studies those differences and guides on lighting techniques that can appropriately and specifically cater for pedestrians. The findings are based on a review of literature incorporated with information from the lighting industry.

Research Report 342 A literature review on driver fatigue among drivers in the general public

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The New Zealand government is seeking to reduce the number of road crashes that arise from driver fatigue in this country. To this end, Land Transport New Zealand commissioned a review of international driver fatigue literature (2000–2007) to assess measures against driver fatigue that would be effective for general public drivers. The review first notes that a number of disciplines study driver fatigue, each using its own definitions and so emphasising different measures. This constrains the development of measures and longer-term programmes for the general public. The review thus notes the need for evidence-based theory specific to general-public driver fatigue. This would enable clearer understanding and facilitate the design, management and evaluation of programmes.

Research Report 065 Retroreflectivity: A recommended minimum value

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Roadmarkings are provided on roads to give guidance of the route ahead. To be effective at night-time, roadmarkings need to have adequate retroreflective properties. A recommended minimum value of retroreflectivity was established that is appropriate for roadmarkings used on New Zealand roads. This minimum reflective value is 90 mcd.m¯².lux¯¹.

Research Report 288 Assessment of hazard warning signs used on New Zealand roads

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This study, carried out in 2004 at the Traffic and Road Safety Research Laboratory, University of Waikato, assessed driver reactions to 16 road hazard warning signs of various formats. A range of measures, including attentional and search conspicuity, implicit and explicit recognition, dynamic and static comprehension, and sign priming were collected for hazard warning signs for road works, schools, slippery surfaces and curves. Conclusions are presented about the effectiveness of hazard warning signs, and the method for evaluating new and existing hazard warning signs used on New Zealand roads. Keywords: crashes, driver behaviour, hazards, risk, road accidents, road signs, roads, traffic, vehicles

Research Report 344 Personal security in public transport travel in NZ: problems issues and solutions

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research project explores concerns about personal security by users of public transport. The findings from an international literature review are used, and the concerns of public transport users in three New Zealand cities (Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch) that have significant public transport patronage streams are explored. Personal security concerns were found to discourage existing patrons from using public transport, and more so after dark. A number of security measures preferred by patrons are outlined. However, the project also found that only a small proportion of patrons actually noticed the presence of security measures that had been installed.

Research Report 517 Use of roadside barriers versus clear zones

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report summarises research carried out in 2011–12 to quantify the effects of roadside barriers and clear zones on mitigation of run-off-road crash numbers and crash severity for New Zealand road and roadside characteristics through statistical and computer simulation modelling. The purpose of the research was to provide practitioners with information that would allow them to make safe, more appropriate and cost-effective treatments for specific conditions.

Research Report 636 Speed limit reductions to support lower SCRIM investigatory levels

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report details a framework for rationally arriving at economically justifiable operating speed reductions to compensate for the inability to achieve recommended levels of skid resistance on high-risk curves. The framework is based on vehicle speed-related procedures incorporated in the Transport Agency’s Economic evaluation manual. These procedures include travel time, vehicle operating costs, carbon dioxide emissions and crash severity. Relationships between the skid resistance level of the road surface and curve crash risk and expected service life of the road surface derived from previous New Zealand specific research are also employed.

Research Report 544 New Zealanders attitudes towards drug-driving and suggested countermeasures

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This study conducted in New Zealand in 2012 investigated the attitudes, prevalence, habits and self-reported risks associated with drug-driving, along with possible countermeasures. Telephone and internet surveys were used for a general population sample. Face-to-face interviews, mainly in prisons, surveyed habitual users of four main drug types: alcohol and other drugs, cannabis, methamphetamine and benzodiazepine.
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