Skip to content

CORONAVIRUS DISEASE (COVID-19) SERVICES UPDATE: due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all of our offices are closed to the public. More information on our services

SCAM ALERT: vehicle licence (rego) renewal phishing emails

Access keys for nzta.govt.nz

  • h Home
  • m Menu
  • 0 Show list of access keys
  • 2 Skip to content
  • 3 Skip to top

Resources

Filter by:

Results

Sort by: Relevancy | Date | Title

Displaying Page 2 of 9

Research Report 020 Land transport pricing: digest report

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This digest summarises the findings of two reports prepared as part of Transit New Zealand's transport pricing study, excluding recommendations for further research which are the subject of another document. These reports surveyed the international literature on transport pricing, considering the justification and available mechanisms for charges to cover road wear and maintenance, congestion, accidents, and various environmental effects. Keywords: Charging, congestion, costs, environmental effects, externalities, land transport, pricing, roads, road users

Research Report 201 Quantifying the impact of social severance caused by roads

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report describes investigating ways of quantifying the severance effects of roads. Extensive investigations were made of overseas practice, to see what, if any, potential existed for modifying existing procedures to New Zealand conditions. The research concluded that insufficient background information existed to transfer other methods in a reliable manner. Therefore a stated preference survey was designed to quantify the parameters associated with a contingent valuation appraisal of this issue. Details of the survey design are presented, but significantly more work is needed to trial this approach. Estimates of the resources required to carry out this additional work are also included in the report. Keywords: cost-benefit analysis, communities, environment, evaluation, roads, severance, society, traffic

Research Report 331 Impacts of fuel price changes on New Zealand transport

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The impacts of petrol price changes on petrol consumption, traffic volume and public transport patronage in New Zealand are discussed. Based on this evidence and that from Australia and other countries, a set of ‘best estimate’ petrol price elasticities for the New Zealand context, of –0. 15 for the short run and of –0. 20 for the medium run, are recommended. Transport fuel prices in New Zealand (as in other countries) have varied quite dramatically over the last five years.

Research Report 138 Travel time values theoretical framework and research outline – stage 1

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

A research project was undertaken in 1996/97 to review issues and practices relating to the valuation of travel time savings in New Zealand and internationally, and to develop an appropriate framework and an outline market research programme for establishing improved valuations of travel time savings in New Zealand. It was intended that the valuations would then be incorporated into procedures for evaluating transport improvement projects in New Zealand. The project involved: review of New Zealand and international practice relating to the valuation of travel times savings; appraisal of theoretical issues in the valuation of travel time savings and development of an appropriate analytical framework for valuation; review of market research approaches to obtaining valuations of time savings; and development of an outline research programme for undertaking market research in New Zealand. Keywords: valuation of travel time, New Zealand

Research report 464 Incorporating travel time reliability in the estimation of assignment models

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Route choice is determined by some function of mean travel time and distance on the routes available in most traffic assignment models. Increasing traffic volumes on a route increases delay, making a particular route less desirable. The NZ Transport Agency (2010) Economic evaluation manual allows the benefits of improved network reliability to be monetised. However, our network models are unable to provide a convenient means of calculating the road user responses to travel time variability. Route choice is a more complex issue than a comparison of relative travel times and distance. It appears that road users are also considering travel time variability in their route choice. Variability may occur as a result of congestion in cities or on any network as a result of road geometry, a high volume of heavy vehicles on narrow steep roads, or other reasons.

Research Report 027 Competition for passenger transport contracts

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

In 1989 the New Zealand government introduced legislation to reform the process whereby public funds were spent on the procurement of public passenger transport services, and to take effect from 1 July 1991. Under this legislation Transit New Zealand was responsible for approving Competitive Pricing Procedures (CPPs) which must be followed before passenger transport services are eligible for public funding. To identify if the required efficiencies were being achieved, an extensive review of international public transport tendering and contracting practices, especially in the United Kingdom and the United States of America, and discussions with funding authorities and operators in New Zealand, were undertaken. Key issues have been identified that have the potential to impact on competition and contract pricing.

Research Report 053 National traffic database – Content and operation of database

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The National Traffic Database is a system for storing traffic data collected from each of approximately 120,000 sections of New Zealand public roads (ie the state highway and local road network). It incorporates data collected by each Road Controlling Authority (RCA), ie by Transit New Zealand Regional Offices for state highways and by Territorial Authorities (TAs) for local roads. The road sections are those defined in the RAMM (Road Assessment and Maintenance Management system) databases of each RCA. The National Traffic Database describes the relative traffic demand on New Zealand public roads, in terms of traffic volume (Annual Average Daily Traffic – AADT), traffic composition by vehicle class and by vehicle weight. Such a compilation of these data has not been made elsewhere in the world, according to international literature.

Research Report 330 Commercial vehicle usage and forecasting – stage 2: national freight matrix

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report presents the findings of the second stage of research looking at regional transport modelling and long-term road planning. The research aimed to define the amount of commercial traffic on the major highways in New Zealand, giving trip numbers at the boundaries of each region, and the likely destination and routes taken by these trips within the region. Stage One was completed in February 2002. Stage Two was broken down into two parts which were completed in the 2004–2005 and 2006–2007 research programmes. The Stage Two research can be broken down into five major components of work:

literature review and New Zealand freight overview
input-output analysis model
SATURN traffic model
gravity model, and
model comparisons and recommendations. The three models are essentially three ways of looking at the same problem. Three matrices were derived from each model, giving a robust approach and a means of calibrating the results.

Research Report 268 Trip chaining: understanding how New Zealanders link their travel

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

There has been increasing interest by governments in New Zealand in replacing short car trips (<5 km) with trips using other more environmentally friendly modes, such as passenger transport, walking and cycling. However, discussion of the potential for changing short trips often misuses the available data, with the potential cited being based on trip 'segments' (or legs), which often differ from what most people would consider as a 'trip' or what we define as a 'trip chain'. The Land Transport Safety Authority's 1997/98 New Zealand (Household) Travel Survey database during 2003–2004 has been reformulated to derive trip chains and tours (beginning and ending at home) to better understand New Zealanders’ travel behaviour.

Research Report 136 Park and ride policies and criteria

Published: | Category: Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

In urban areas with relatively low population densities and high car ownership, as in New Zealand, 'park and ride' (P+R) is a potentially powerful urban transport policy tool. It is being adopted in cities worldwide (including UK, Europe, and Australia) as a major component of urban transport policies to restrain road traffic and to encourage public transport use. This report describes a project, carried out in 1998, to develop guidelines and criteria to assist in the planning and demand estimation for P+R policies and facilities in New Zealand's major urban centres. It will have direct applications in urban transport policy development and planning studies, including modelling and evaluation aspects. P+R attempts to combine the benefits of both car use and public transport use into an efficient and effective system and to transfer parking demand from the central business district (CBD) to suburban/urban fringe locations.
Top